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  • Hot Wheels:  The 10 Most Stolen Vehicles In The U.S. As Auto Crime Explodes Across America

    Hot Wheels:  The 10 Most Stolen Vehicles In The U.S. As Auto Crime Explodes Across America

    Things aren't looking good when it comes to auto crime in the U.S.   The National Insurance Crime Bureau reports near record highs in vehicle and catalytic converter thefts as well as violent carjackings in 2021.  The NICB shares its alarming statistics in its Summer issue of The NICB Informer.

    “Nowhere has the escalation of crime across the nation been more apparent than with auto crime,” said David Glawe, president and CEO of the National Insurance Crime Bureau. “Crime is a business, and the business of auto-related crimes is very good in many of our neighborhoods.”

    Here's a look at the NICB's numbers. In 2021:

    • Catalytic converter theft claims increased 1,215% compared to 2019
    • Car thefts increased by 17% in 2021 compared to 2019
    • New York City, Philadelphia, Chicago, and Washington, D.C., have experienced triple-digit increases in carjackings, the highest escalations in the nation.

    "We partner closely with federal and local law enforcement agencies to resolve these cases," said Glawe. "NICB has also been front and center in raising public awareness of these crimes through media interviews, public service announcements, and advocacy efforts."

    2021 Hot Wheels Report


    The NICB's just released 2021 Hot Wheels report breaks down the list of vehicles stolen the most in 2021. The NICB says of the nearly 1 million total vehicles reported stolen in 2021, 14% of passenger vehicles were Chevrolet, Ford, and GMC full size pick-up models. Passenger vehicle thefts increased 8% in 2021 compared to 2020.

    As in 2020, pickup trucks lead the list but Chevy and Ford swap spots for 1st and 2nd.  The Honda Civic, Accord and Toyota Camry retain their spots in the top five. Of note, the Jeep Grand Cherokee makes the list for the first time, while the Dodge full-size pickup drops off.

    Here is the NICB's list of the 2021's Top 10 Most Stolen Vehicles:

    Rank Vehicle Make/Model 2021 Total Thefts Model Year Most Often Stolen
    1. Chevrolet Pick-Up (Full Size) 48,206 2004
    2. Ford Pick-Up (Full Size) 47,999 2006
    3. Honda Civic 31,673 2000
    4. Honda Accord 30,274 1997
    5. Toyota Camry 17,270 2007
    6. GMC Pick-Up (Full Size) 15,599 2005
    7. Nissan Altima 14,108 2020
    8. Honda CR-V 13,308 2000
    9. Jeep Cherokee/Grand Cherokee 13,210 2018
    10. Toyota Corolla 12,927 2020

     

    NICB Tips


    Here are some tips the NICB recommends vehicle owners take to avoid becoming a victim of auto theft.

    • Roll up your windows, lock your doors, and take the keys or fob.
    • Park in well-lit areas and, when possible, areas staffed by security personnel and further protected by surveillance cameras.
    • Remove valuables from your car or keep valuables locked in your trunk or out of sight under a rear deck cover.
    • Consider adding an immobilizing or tracking device for your vehicle.

    Call police along with your insurer immediately if your car is stolen.  NICB says its data shows that reporting a vehicle as soon as possible after it is stolen increases the chance of recovery.  

    For more information 


    If you want to read more about the NICB's efforts to fight auto crime with data and dig even deeper into vehicle crime statistics with the latest ForeCAST Report which also covers gasoline theft, check out The NICB Informer digital edition.  You'll also learn more about the partnership between the NICB and the U.S Postal Inspection Service, as well as the learn about the types of fraud the USPIS is seeing and how these crimes impact victims of all demographics and socioeconomic categories.  The NICB also says additionally, the Ukraine invasion is affecting the insurance market in a big way, so the issue examines how war crimes affect the industry.

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